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BN-W eNewsletter #34

Posted in: eNews 2005
By BN-W
May 16, 2005 - 1:42:41 PM

FILM(S) MONITORED
UNLEASHED
MINDHUNTERS
MONSTER-IN-LAW


All we can say about the three movies monitored below is that it must be nice to get paid millions to put out crap (fortunately, most of us are smart enough to avoid moviegoing these days, which is why the box office grosses are still in a steady decline.)   If we weren’t doing the BN-W monitor, the majority of these films we’ve had to see this past year would never have been seen by any of us.   Luckily, however, there are some decent independent/art house/foreign language films out there worth spending time and money on.   How many times can Jennifer Lopez play the same basic character in her films and have no Hispanic friends or relatives?   How many times can Wanda Sykes say “oh shi*t” in one film?  

The choices were so bad this week, we’re going back to last week’s movie, “Crash,” which as you all know we highly recommended that you see for yourself – and still do.   We came across an excellent review of it from “Eyecalone,” who positively (A-) reviewed it for playahata.com.   This review delves much deeper into what BN-W touched on last week and lays it out flawlessly.   Please click on the following link and read paragraph 3:   Crash.   You’ve got to respect the simple and factual breakdown of the “attempts to explain-away White racism” that this reviewer points out.   And we agree with the reviewer that despite this particular bent the writer, who’s a White male, has taken, it’s still a must-see film.   [ NOTE:   Because we feel it’s such an on-point review and worthy of sharing, for those who get faxed and hard copies of the BN-W documents, we’ve included the text for paragraph 3* at the end of this document for you or you can type www.playahata.com/pages/reviews/movie_atog.htm into your Internet browser and when the site comes up, select “Crash” for the complete review.]

We mentioned in our “analysis” (BN-W #26) that Chappelle was still young and possibility for change or seeing the light was something that could be realized.   Based on this portion of the Time magazine interview, maybe he will turn it around for himself after all; and it will be interesting to see how this situation turns out.   “The problem, he says, started with his inner circle.   ‘If you don’t have the right people around you and you’re moving at a million miles an hour you can lose yourself,’ he says.   ‘Everyone around me says, ‘You’re a genius!’; ‘You’re great!’; ‘That’s your voice!’   But I’m not sure that they’re right.”   Click on this link to read this portion of the interview in full:   TIME.com: On the Beach With Dave Chappelle

As mentioned in BN-W #33, we have updated our chart monitoring system and format.   The primary change is that we will no longer put the range for the number of times the N-word was used in a film because once is too much, especially if it’s excessive and/or unnecessary use, which unfortunately was the case in most of the films/DVDs (and all of the CDs) that used this derogatory word since we started monitoring one year ago – May 2004.   Another change is that based on the history of White Supremacy in this country and the fact that it’s been steadfast against Blacks and Jewish people, even though Jewish describes the people of a type of religion (Judaism) and those same people are primarily White, we, nonetheless, think there’s a connection between Blacks/Jews/White Supremacy that’s worth exploring.   So, for the monitored films only, we will include a column that will note if any Jewish derogatory slang terms (kike, hymie, hooknose, etc.) are used.   We don’t think it’s necessary to do for the music because over the past year, there’s never been any derogatory Jewish slang terms used in the lyrics.   When we hear that one usage of the N-word, that’s it – we will not continue wasting our quality time listening to and/or reading the lyrics.   We did our homework for a year already on these lyrics and that’s more than enough of suffering through the ignorance.  

We think this is a valid issue to watch because it appears that so many of the films and music with the excessive and/or unnecessary use of the N-word very often is overseen and greenlighted by top executives who just happen to be Jewish.   We recently gave you examples of Edgar Bronfman Jr. (formerly of Universal Music Group) and Lyor Cohen (formerly of Def Jam for about 21 years), who are both now with Warner Music Group after Bronfman recruited Cohen to join his newly acquired company in 2004.   Please go to www.imdb.com to check out their brief biographies, particularly Bronfman who was married to a Black woman in his younger years and with whom he has three children.   According to imdb.com, his father made a statement that children from such a marriage “would have problems being accepted by either Black or White society.”   Another interesting quote we found in an article at northjersey.com entitled “How evil is viewed in history” by Gwynne Dyer, where she writes:   “I also understand why most Jews have zealously defended the unique status of the calamity that befell their people and resisted any link with other, smaller but not utterly dissimilar tragedies that have befallen other peoples:   the Armenian massacres, the Cambodian genocide, Rwanda, and the rest.”   We ask, where does the 246 years of American slavery fit into this equation?   One additional quote from the same article is:   “We cannot afford to let Hitler fade into the past because we need him to remind us of our duty to the present and the future.”   We also ask, if the Holocaust’s 12 years of brutality and murder in Europe shouldn’t be forgotten or allowed to fade (and rightfully so), then what is the best way to remind everyone of the 246 years of slavery, rapes, murder, brutality and then another 100 years of the latter three, plus Jim Crow laws and lynchings experienced by Blacks right here on American soil?   So, other than being human beings, Blacks and Jews do have something in common and that’s why we feel it’s appropriate to observe why the use of “nigger” is allowed so much leeway in the entertainment industry while “kike” is allowed none.   Shouldn’t the same standards apply to both?

If you missed any other BN-W monitors, just send an e-mail to bannword2@yahoo.com and request that it be sent to you.   It’s very hard not to give any content critique on the films we monitor, so we will no longer even attempt to abide by that statement.   But we definitely do continue to highly encourage you to see these films for yourself and, if applicable, make your own judgment call on the N-word usage – appropriate/inappropriate? necessary/unnecessary? sensible/nonsensical? does it add to or take away from the film’s concept? does the N-word have to be used at all? is there a valid reason for doing so? is it mandatory for the scene(s) to be effective? what are the circumstances/situation that necessitate any use of the word? is it just thrown in for humor, fear, crime, insult? are other culturally insulting slang terms used as much as the N-word in the film?   Lots of questions and a whole lot of reasons to wonder what’s the real purpose and thought process behind why these actors, writers, directors, producers, executive producers, distributors, and studios/studio heads and executives give the “greenlight” for these crews to liberally use (or allow to be used) the N-word.

FEATURE FILM(S) :

U N L E A S H E D

[Release Date:   5/13/05]

Starring Jet Li, Morgan Freeman; screenplay written by Luc Besson; directed by Louis Leterrier; produced by Luc Besson, Jet Li, Steven Chasman; executive produced by [Not Listed]; studio – Rogue Pictures
 

NONE

LOW TO EXCESSIVE

DEROGATORY JEWISH TERMS

XXXXX

 

NO

M I N D H U N T E R S

[Release Date:   5/13/05]

Starring LL Cool J, Val Kilmer; screenplay written by Wayne Kramer, Kevin Brodbin; directed by Renny Harlin; produced by Cary Brokaw, Jeffrey Silver, Bobby Newmyer, Rebecca Spikings; executive produced by Moritz Borman, Guy East, Nigel Sinclair, Renny Harlin; studio – Dimension Films
 

NONE

LOW TO EXCESSIVE

DEROGATORY JEWISH TERMS

XXXXX

 

NO

M O N S T E R – I N – L A W

[Release Date:   5/13/05]

Starring Jennifer Lopez, Jane Fonda, Wanda Sykes; screenplay written by Anya Kochoff; directed by Robert Luketic; produced by Paula Weinstein, Chris Bender, JC Spink; executive produced by Michael Flynn, Toby Emmerich, Richard Brener; studio – New Line Cinema
 

NONE

LOW TO EXCESSIVE

DEROGATORY JEWISH TERMS

XXXXX

 

NO

BN-W Monitor Coming Soon:   “Rebound” [Martin Lawrence]; “The Honeymooners” [Cedric the Entertainer, Gabrielle Union]; “Rize” [Documentary]; “The Longest Yard” [Adam Sandler, Chris Rock]; “Stealth” [Jamie Foxx, Josh Lucas]; “An Unfinished Life” [Jennifer Lopez, Robert Redford, Morgan Freeman]; “Hustle & Flow” [Terrence Howard]; “Pink Panther” [Steve Martin, Beyonce Knowles]; “Four Brothers” [Tyrese Gibson, Andre Benjamin]; “Broken Flowers” [Bill Murray, Jeffrey Wright]

Also Coming :   DVD Monitoring; Spring 2005 Music Monitoring

*Text for paragraph 3 of “Crash” review by Eyecalone for http://www.playahata.com/:   “Writer Paul Haggis said he was inspired to write the script after he was carjacked at gunpoint coming out of a video store in Los Angeles.   After returning home and changing all the locks in his house, he started thinking about the men who stole his car – how long they’d been friends; what they did in their downtime.   Haggis said he tried to tackle the carjackers story from the perspective of the carjacker, a feat I would say he deserves credit for at least trying, but undoubtedly Haggis’ ability to see the world from this or any perspective of a person of color (particularly a Black one) is quite limited.   In fact, I would say the marginal success of expressing the view and experiences of the film’s Black characters is one of the few suspect points in the film.   Though they are interesting, and not at all one-dimensional Black characters, and some of the ways in which race and racism is dealt with in this film make it abundantly clear that it was written by a White male.   In a scene sure to send chills down the spine of nearly any Black adult who has ever had an encounter with the police, the Black television director played by Terrence Howard (who in my opinion is an exceptional, but underrated actor) and his wife are pulled over rather arbitrarily by the LAPD.   The encounter leads to one of the officers, an often detestable and racist cop, played by Matt Dillon, groping and violating the Black director’s significant other.   It’s a scene that many African-American men and women will likely find particularly hard to come to terms with as you find yourself asking, ‘what would you have done?’   At the same time no expense is spared in efforts to later humanize this officer.   It’s not that other characters aren’t also humanized and attempts made to explain their behavior, it’s just that in the cases with racism involving Whites there seems to be an attempt to explain it as a response to ‘something.’   The racist gun shop owner who verbally abuses the Persian storeowner and his daughter is responding to September 11th; the racist cop who abuses his power is angry about what perceived preferential treatment of Blacks ala affirmative action; the District Attorney’s wife (Bullock) has a problem with people of color because she was carjacked and traumatized, etc.  The attempts to explain-away White racism lead to diatribes that often go without rebuttal or address and really belie the way racism operates and is lived in this country.   Simply put racism, particularly the pervasive kind projected against people of color (mainly Blacks and Latinos) in America is NOT a ‘response’ to any mistreatment of Whites, it’s simply part of the social fabric that this country was woven with and it’s an issue this nation refuses to address.   It is the racist in a position of power either individually or collectively who have concocted these fantasies about being under siege, when in fact this country to lesser or greater degrees has always been this way, and so have the psyches of the racist and the generations who preceded them.”

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