BNW Home About Us Mission & Philosophy Events Calendar Video Center FAQs Privacy Contact eNewsletters Home About Us Mission & Philosophy Events Calendar Video Center FAQs Privacy Contact eNewsletters  
Ban The N Word
Dove egypt Egypt
 

BN-W eNewsletter #78

Posted in: eNews 2007
By BN-W
Apr 27, 2007 - 8:01:56 AM

FILM(S) MONITORED
REIGN OVER ME
SHOOTER
ARE WE DONE YET?
PERFECT STRANGER
SLOW BURN


 

The monitor of the film(s) listed above is farther down in this eNewsletter.  Due to a major Internet Service Provider (ISP) problem that went from no service to dial-up for nearly three weeks, we had to unexpectedly delay this eNewsletter.   Since we don’t have cable, we made the best of this Internet-free period by watching cable at a friend’s home and seeing what we’ve been missing – it   turned out that we hadn’t missed much and it was the same as usual in terms of news reports, commentators/pundits, advertising/commercials, images.

As we all know – and it certainly didn’t start with the Imus comments – racism has never gone anywhere and is very much still alive and thriving in America.   Not talking about it and acting as if those days are history has long proven to not only be a mistake but this blind denial by many won’t make it go away or become nonexistent and really only encourages a growth and festering that’s based on miseducation, misinformation, and confusion, so let the dialogue, massive re-education process – and action – begin.   And on this topic of America’s “hidden” history, many of you may have seen the recently aired Alex Haley mini-series ROOTS” that we referenced in a special BN-W announcement as well as in our last eNewsletter.   As a follow-up, we received a press release from the Terrie Williams Agency that a 30th anniversary book re-release and DVD will both be issued on May 22nd through Vanguard Press and Warner Home Video, respectively.   A first-ever audio version of this standout movie will also be provided by BBC Audio.   The book will contain a special eight-page insert written by Haley on the challenges he encountered during the ten-year journey to get the book published and it has an introduction by Michael Eric Dyson; the DVD will include news and special features.

The late Amos Wilson said the following:   “If another people rest on your ignorance – and they do – then they will educate you into ignorance.”   Remember that.

As those BN-W readers who also visit our Web site may already know, we’ve added some new links.   We sent a special announcement about this performance in August 2004 by Julian Curry on HBO’s Def Poetry called “Niggers, Niggas & Niggaz.”   Someone posted it in January and it’s quickly nearing 200,000 views.   It was powerful on the occasions Curry performed it for us personally nearly three years ago and it’s still powerful today.   Here is the must-see video:   Julian Curry

We’ve also added three links for the Without Sanctuary book, which is referenced and quoted in the BN-W Historical Timeline.   These links include flash movie footage, still photos, and a link to the site’s main page.   Again, as with much in America, school administrators and educators will rarely teach students about this primary part of America’s “great” past:

Movie (with narrative)
Photos
Main

As for the murders at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech), it’s very clear that Seung-Hui Cho suffered from a mental illness that perhaps his family may have been ashamed of.   Apparently his college tuition/room and board were paid and he had access to money, yet, according to his roommates, he never went home during breaks.   His family had to know he had mental problems from childhood and they just sent him out into the world without checking on him regularly – or being in touch with a school advisor.   A child with a major mental illness is no different than one with a major physical disability or illness – they must be watched and cared for even from a distance.   You can’t just send your child away and hope the problem will just go away on its own or somehow magically get better.   Those situations have to be dealt with – even if it’s for life.   Too many Asians have expressed more concern about a “backlash” as opposed to concern for the environment of shame, silence, and denial that probably helped the escalation of Cho’s mental condition.   Even Cho’s sister expressed deep regret that her brother “made the world weep” and thus causing them to live a “nightmare.”   The need for many Asians in America to keep up a façade of perfection that was unfairly imposed upon them by a White society is acknowledged by Tamara K. Nopper in What May Come:   Asian Americans and the Virginia Tech Shootings with these words:   “…the model minority myth is a White racist invention that elevates Asians over [other] minority groups…”  

The news (and talk shows) also did its usual butcher job on presenting the “facts.”   Virginia Tech is not the largest massacre in America’s history.   Yes, you guessed it, mass murders of Blacks by White mobs get that distinction.   There were numerous incidents, but one of the most prominent was the riot in Tulsa, Oklahoma, where hundreds of Blacks were murdered in an economically vibrant area known as Black Wall Street, which was  destroyed with fire as well as air attacks of fire bombs and dynamite explosives being dropped from planes to definitively destroy this very prosperous town.  Following are some general and detailed accountings of yet another “hidden” American truth from the Chicago Defender and the Tulsa Reparations Coalition:

Genocide on ‘Black Wall Street’ - General

The Tulsa Race Riot – Detailed

Final Report of the Oklahoma Commission to Study The Tulsa Race Riot of 1921

INTERESTING WEB SITES/LINKS/ARTICLES OF THE DAY:

Last month we attended the 20th anniversary celebration of CEMOTAP (Committee to Eliminate Media Offensive to African People) and it was a wonderful event with some powerful speakers that included Harriett Washington, who wrote Medical Apartheid: The Dark History of Medical Experimentation on Black Americans from Colonial Times to the Present (the link for this book and an interview with her is on our site); Marimba Ani, who wrote Yurugu: An African-Centered Critique of European Cultural Thought and Behavior; and Abdulalim Shabazz.   We first referenced Dr. Ani in BN-W #64, but now we’re going to provide you with some additional information, including a short video and book excerpts.   For those of you not familiar with her, she’s a deep Sister and a very intellectual thinker – she’s figured it out and really lays it down.   Also, as an FYI, her book is very difficult to get and for that reason it can be costly but with enough searching (foot and otherwise) you may be able to get it for $40 or less.   A quick definition of Yurugu as taken from her book is:   “A being in Dogon Mythology which is responsible for disorder in the universe.   This is a being conceived in denial of the natural order, which then acts to initiate and promote disharmony in the universe.   In African Cosmology such a being is deficient in spiritual sensibility, is perpetually in conflict, is limited cognitively, and is threatening to the well-being of humanity.”  

Ani – Bio

Yurugu – Author’s Description

Yurugu – Video

Excerpts:   Chapter 1       Chapter 6

Amazon

Dr. Abdulalim Shabazz is a master mathematician and educator who was born in 1927 (although he could easily pass for at least twenty years younger), so he has a complete understanding of the full scope of the then-and-now of this country.   He’s still very successful in his approach to teaching mathematics and many of his students have gone on to get PhDs in the subject.   In addition to his mathematical genius, he is also multilingual.   In an interview done in 1990, Dr. Shabazz states the following:   “Solving this problem of poor teaching in general and poor mathematics teaching in particular is enormous and is rooted in the American way – which never intended to educate the masses of the people.   It only intended to really educate about 1/3 of the population which would run the country and its businesses.   The proper education of African Americans upsets this social stratification, because we can leave the salt mines today and go into the upper echelons of society tomorrow.”  Here’s the complete interview:

Developing African Americans in Mathematics  by Gloria F. Gilmer

Now that we’ve just provided some background information on some of America’s pathology we should all have a better understanding of the thought process of the Don Imus mindsets, we can now move forward with some other big news stories over the last few weeks.   If the Duke University lacrosse players had nothing to do with whatever happened to that woman, then the charges should have been dropped.   At least they were not  lynched, castrated, and body parts sold as souvenirs like what happened to so many Black men falsely accused of raping White women.   As for the victim, at least she wasn’t forced to have sex against her will and then forced to carry a child by a rapist as so many Black women – and female children – were forced to do for centuries after being raped by White men.   Something happened in that house – those women were called Ns and Bs and fled from that house.   What, we’ll never know because all the players have adhered to a code of silence or a “no snitch” policy on that night?   Although predictable, it was nevertheless interesting to see the script play out so classically when you juxtapose the Duke lacrosse players case to that of the Central Park jogger case.   The media interviewed Linda Fairstein (jogger case District Attorney) and others to say that these young men (the majority of whom had already served their time) were still guilty of the crime and shouldn’t have been vindicated.   Whereas in the Duke case, they had no one from the opposing side questioning or disputing their innocence.   In both cases, DNA proved the suspects didn’t do it;   but in the Central Park jogger case, the perpetrator came forward, admitted his guilt, and told exactly what happened, which corroborated with the evidence.    Yet, the media had people on to say the Central Park young men were still guilty.   Yes, predictable and expected, but still worthy of a smirk and a head shake.  

Of course, the inevitable Tawana Brawley name was popping up all over the place with all the news stories going on that involved the Duke players, Don Imus, Al Sharpton, and Jesse Jackson.   We’ve given this link before and we’re giving it again since the media never mentions these facts and so many people think they can just toss the Brawley name out there and believe, again, that nothing happened in that case either.   Read it for yourself and if nothing else at least you’ll know more than what the media will ever report:   Tawana Brawley FAQs

As for Don Imus – who cares?   Yes, it’s a good thing he was fired.   Who needs that negative vibe?   And for those of you so heartbroken that the nearly 70-year-old decrepit-looking bigot may not be able to make a living or lose his livelihood, which so many White men and women in the media expressed worry about, Imus will be just fine.   He’s not someone supporting a family of four on a $20,000 annual salary and living in New York City.   He was paid a multimillion dollar yearly income to talk hate and he received huge tax breaks (and thus perks) for his “charitable” deeds, including that ranch which he surely used for his personal benefit as well.   So, don’t shed your precious tears for the old fellow because he’s certainly not shedding any for you.   If he’s smart though, he’ll take some time away from the spotlight, do some serious self-analysis, and figure out why he feels a need to constantly berate, name-call, and “make fun” of people.   At his age, that kind of mentality not only shows a disgraceful level of ignorance that’s not just about racism, sexism, and bigotry, but it is an indication of deeper and unresolved issues of self-esteem and self-acceptance (we all know by now that having money doesn’t mean all is well).   Perhaps he was verbally abused by someone who was supposed to love him at an early age and his defense mechanism against hurtful words from others has become to “give it” before he “gets it.”   Just like there’s always a reason for those that physically bully, there’s also a reason for those that verbally bully.   In Imus’ case it definitely includes a White supremacist mentality but with that – as is commonly the case – there is a whole lot of insecurity.   Entertainment critic Kam Williams wrote this excellent op-ed on Imus:   There Must Still Be Something Out of Kilter .   Imus fits in right along with other radio/television talk show hosts that include Rush Limbaugh, Sean Hannity, Michael Savage, Bill O’Reilly, Lou Dobbs (daily anti-immigrant diatribe) as well as CNN contributor William Bennett (former education secretary who talked about aborting Black babies to reduce crime) where White males basically spout patriotism when the underlying premise of what they’re really talking about is White supremacy.  

As the study of America’s history will clearly show, men like Imus have been thorns and literally unwanted bug-a-boos to Black women for centuries, and it continues today, which is why so many Black women will have nothing to do with White men as far as mating.   From what’s been told to us, White men are truly a dime a dozen in that department, but it doesn’t matter.   Imus even describes himself as a man with a “good” heart.   Oh really!   If that’s a good heart then a bad one must be the embodiment of pure evil.   Oprah can try to minimize the availability of Black men all day and all night long as she did on a recent show and as she does in selecting very few positive Black males as guests (we’ve yet to see a Black Dr. Oz/Dr. Phil or a Black version of her beloved Nate for that matter) on her show, but it won’t work when young and old versions of the Imuses of the world are the option.   Sisters know better, want better, and will get better – and will never expend the power of the Black male babies that only they can birth.   So, let’s keep it really real.   No Black people – including Black men – are expendable.   And Oprah shouldn’t have to be reminded of that.   We wrote about this topic in BN-W #56 for the monitor we did on Sanaa Lathan’s “ Something New ” movie in February 2006.   If you have the time, it’s worth another read.   And just as an aside, here are the lyrics to Brown Sugar by The Rolling Stones.   This is what Black women despise but this, too, is part of America’s pathology.   Our ancestors were burdened by White men and their untoward advances, which not only caused problems for Black male/female relationships, but it also made Black women the wrath of many White women because their men were raping and impregnating other women and even female children.   Their husbands were rapists and pedophiles for centuries – long before it was classified as illegal and felonious.   That’s why it’s always been difficult for Black and White women to be true comrades, because of this past and the fact that it doesn’t get talked about or written about in the schoolbooks.   There’s just a silent bitterness that continues to go unacknowledged because those are still unhealed wounds that have yet to be discussed openly and honestly.

In African Women, White Men, Sex and Don Imus , Mark P. Fancher writes about many interesting topics, including the countenance of mass rape and the emasculation of Black men in this country for centuries, the internalization of self-hatred, the dehumanization of Blacks, and the question of who these corporate executives put this image out for – are these images of so-called Blackness the “products of White middle-aged executive male fantasies that have been tailored to appeal to the White, suburban teenaged demographic that accounts for more than three-quarters of all Hip-Hop music sales.”   And in Caucasian Please!   America’s True Double Standard for Misogyny and Racism , Edward Rhymes gives a solid comparison on hip-hop lyrics and rock lyrics, which were misogynistic and foul toward women long before rap was even on the scene.   He also touches on “porn (the ultimate god of misogyny).”   Quite frankly, the mistreatment and disrespect of women in this country – regardless of “color” – has been a problem since this land was ruthlessly pillaged from the Native Americans.   Two more excellent articles on the myriad topics that this issue has evoked are:   Are You a Hip-Hop Apologist? by Paris who digs into the White corporate role in pushing negativity and how for a group like Public Enemy, “they’ll take the Flav, but not the Chuck.”   You know that can’t be denied!   Matt Taibbi, a White Rolling Stone magazine writer, also writes a good one:   Imus Is Out, But Whitey Execs Get the Last Laugh .   In addition to all the topics covered above, he writes about the minstrelsy going on by Black artists, White corporate executives selling “Black misery” to White kids, Black intellectuals so easily buying into pseudo-Black empowerment and manhood (“Like Tupac was the next Malcolm or something.”), and how the “Black heroes of these videos are too stupid to buy land or influence or industry stock with their money, they’ve gotta blow it all on the first shiny ring or phat ride they see.”   Well!

As for “nappy-headed,” anybody with the least bit of common sense, mixed with just a little bit of the basics on history, and add in the ability to see people around you on a daily basis should know that when it comes to people of African descent, that type of generalization is useless and there is no one-type-fits-all when it comes to hair texture – just as it isn’t when it comes to the melanin level in our skin.   During our cable-tv watch update, we saw the usual bottle blonde and overly made up news reporters/anchors/correspondents and entertainers as well as the same in commercials that have an impact on what’s supposed to be culturally and visually acceptable.   Of course we have Oprah, Gayle King, Beyonce, Tara Banks, and most Black news reporters/anchors who play into the mainstream acceptable “look” as well via perms, wigs, and weaves, thus subtly suggesting to many of our already fragile young Black girls and women that natural isn’t good enough and influencing many to go toward what’s not natural for them.   Oprah seemingly only wears braids during cross-country drives or during the rough journeys but for the big and fancy events, it’s usually been the perm/wig/weave route; Gayle is getting blonder on every show; Beyonce and Tara – well, no need for us to describe the obvious.   As for the television news shows/programs, how often do you see Black women with locs, sisterlocs, or just a head full of her naturally thick beautiful healthy looking hair – whether it’s very short, shoulder length, or down her back.   All we can say is hair that grows up toward the sun represents nothing but strength and power, so never see that as bad.   Spring is upon us right now, take a look at nature and how it rises.   Yes, simply start to observe, digest, and appreciate the fundamentals of nature’s wonders that are right outside our door everyday and when you really get down to it there’s not a whole lot we need to physically change as humans.   In the meantime, let’s have some fun with the so-called celebrities that way too many people follow and let’s ask ourselves should we really be following these extremely insecure people who are trying to live up to someone else’s standards of “beauty”:   Awful Plastic Surgery .   We provided this link before but here it is again – a link for natural hair care that’s taken from the site of actress T’Keyah Crystal Keymah:   Natural Hair Links

Black people will get around to doing what the Imuses of the world are afraid of – and that is to “wake up.”   Don’t be fooled, misled, or mistaken, Black people won’t forever be the sleeping giants as many of us are right now.   No doubt, we’ve got work to do in removing the conditioning that’s been effective for centuries.   But with unity, everyone knows what Blacks are capable of – and that’s the reason for the constant attacks on the Black image.

We also saw Lisa Fager of Industry Ears on one station and it was good to see that organization getting a chance to be heard on this topic.   Following are two really good articles from her site, including one about the selectivity the music industry (or individual music executives – Jimmy Iovine?)  implements on censoring lyrics when it suits them or it is deemed offensive to Whites:

Interscope Records Lyric Committee?

A Different Perspective on the Imus Incident

As for hip-hop’s influence, particularly gangsta rap, on this whole situation, it has definitely been a detriment to young men and women across the board because there is no balance.   Russell Simmons and his Hip-Hop Summit Action Network are finally admitting there is a problem after years of trying to defend it – senior Benjamin Chavis even tried to differentiate the “er” versus the “a” in the N-word.   But at least it appears they’ve finally awakened so we’ll let go of the past.   As for the rappers/hip-hoppers, they are just doing what they’re told to do to get PAID.   Unfortunately, most of them are not the “poets” that Simmons and rapper Common tried to turn them into on Day 2 of Oprah’s Town Hall Meeting.   Poets usually have a passion for poetry, reading, spirituality, and looking into the soul and all of that kind of mental energy and brain power – and many of them won’t sell their soul for a few dollars, which is why we all know so many struggling poets who work a day job.   Most of today’s rappers are just trying to get PAID because it seems so easy to throw some words – in fact, just about any old words will do – down to a fly beat.   Jay-Z even admitted to this.  He’s no poet!   He even admits that at the core he’s just a businessman.   We’re with you, brother, because we’ve read your lyrics and they show what your bottom line is.   And by now surely everyone’s heard about or read Snoop Dogg’s poetic license in breaking down how hip-hop cannot be compared to Imus’ remarks.   What do you think?

Based on the BN-W Music Monitors we’ve done, we’ve complained about this whole situation since our beginning nearly three years ago.   We’ve always been very clear that the executives who own these companies and the top management that puts the marketing campaigns together are the ones who are a major part of the problem.   We’ve called out the Blacks dancing to the N-word as well as women jamming to lyrics that are offensive to them just because it has a funky beat. We’ve also called out those high-ranking Black executives (Sylvia Rhone, Antonio [LA] Reid, Kevin Liles, Lisa Ellis, Step Johnson, Shawn [Jay-Z] Carter, Jermaine Dupri [JD] Mauldin, Debra Lee, Reginald Hudlin) who’ve let this type of music get marketed globally (through song and video) to such an out of control level.   Why they would allow the denigration of their people to get to this point is senseless and shows the problems we have that extend to the professionals who don’t have the guts or common sense to speak out against the marketing of the negative portrayal of their own people.   C. Dolores Tucker forewarned of this negative escalation and direction of this corporately detoured rap music nearly 20 years ago.   Do you think these Black executives would qualify to be amongst The Black Anglo Saxon as written in this piece by Darryl James?

We’ve acknowledged those Black professionals who are a part of the problem for not stepping up and demanding better from their own.   We’ve also acknowledged that many rappers/hip-hoppers will seemingly do whatever to get PAID but should still know better and have a fundamental sense of pride and respect for themselves, for women in general – but particularly their Black women, and for their fellow Brothers.   How so many of these professionals and entertainers can be duped into selling out their own people is just unspeakably embarrassing.   But now we can get to the primary source of the problem, which are the entertainment owners and top executives – including film, music, and radio executives – who play a major role in perpetuating negative images and stereotypes by financially strongarming artists into making one-dimensional music and then mass marketing it on a global basis through CDs, videos, and same-song rotation on corporate owned and operated radio stations.   We’ve already mentioned and/or referenced most of these individuals in numerous BN-W eNewsletters; below are just some of the people who are the leaders (or major players) of these corporations that intentionally allow the global mass marketing of a negative image of Blacks through not only hip-hop but also through the news media outlets.   And, no, it’s not a conspiracy, it’s just a fact:

Edgar Bronfman, Jr. IMDB Answers Warner Music Group Bio
Lyor Cohen IMDB Answers Warner Music Group Bio | Ask Men
Robert Iger   Answers Disney Bio
L. Lowry Mays   Answers Clear Channel Bio
Les Moonves IMDB Answers CBS Bio
Doug Morris IMDB   Universal Music Group (Vivendi) Bio
Sumner Redstone IMDB Answers CBS Bio | Viacom Bio
Rolf Schmidt-Holtz     Sony BMG
Jeff Smulyan   Answers Emmis Communications Bio
Jeff Zucker     NBC Universal Bio

The following individuals are not part of the executive or top management team for the entire corporation but they have either previously or currently preside over divisions that include some of the top R&B and rap/hip-hop acts that have used the N-word as well as misogynistic lyrics and videos.

Clive Davis IMDB Answers BMG North America
Jimmy Iovine IMDB Interscope/Universal Music Group
Rick Rubin * IMDB Answers

* Rubin was the co-founder along with Russell Simmons of Def Jam Recordings in 1984.

In BN-W #62 we provided two links on the “Loose Change” DVD.   Whether 9/11 was an inside job or not is still a heavily debated topic with the possibility of a film coming out soon that’s supposed to have Rosie O’Donnell as one of the narrators as well as the fact that many family members of 9/11 victims are not satisfied with Rudy Giuliani’s handling of the too-quick cleanup, so we decided to share the following link with our readers.   So far it’s been hit more than 5.5 million times, which means there’s a lot of interest and a lot of debate from both sides.   If you’re interested in theories debunking this viewpoint, do a search for “screwloosechange” and/or “popularmechanics.”   Here is the Google link:   Loose Change Video

More racism in another European country.   During a filmed training session, a German army instructor advises a soldier to do the following:   “You’re in the Bronx, a black van pulls up in front of you and three African-Americans get out and start really insulting your mother…act!”   Now all it takes is an “insult” to shoot and kill Black people?   Wow!   Here’s the video:   German Video

As we mentioned in BN-W #54 the conclusion of Part II:   Black-Jewish Relations will be included with our new bi-monthly Music Monitor.   As we also stated, we’ve got a lot of information, and, for that reason, until Part II comes out, we’ll be filtering stuff to you so it won’t be too overwhelming in the buildup to Part II’s conclusions.   Refer to BN-W #53/54 if you need a repeat of our feelings on the Anti-Defamation League (ADL).  

We’ve previously mentioned some of the issues surrounding Jimmy Carter’s Palestine:   Peace Not Apartheid book as it relates to Alan Dershowitz.   Following are some links about Dershowitz pulling the same tactics on Norman Finkelstein in an attempt to get Finkelstein’s tenure denied:   Noam Chomsky Accuses Alan Dershowitz of Launching a “Jihad” to Block Norman Finkelstein from Getting Tenure at DePaul University.”     Finkelstein also has two articles on his site detailing his interactions with Dershowitz:   When the Talk Gets Too Serious, Send in the Clown and The [Alan] Dershowitz Hoax .   Professor Tony Martin, who wrote “The Jewish Onslaught,” can also attest to the relentless onslaughts/attacks that he received based on nothing but the desire to deny, hide or ignore any truths.  

Last on this Imus topic for now is that he called CNN actor Howard Kurtz a “boner-nosed, beanie-wearing Jewboy” and this is how Kurtz chose to handle it:   Howard Kurtz’s Imus Amnesia  

If you missed any other BN-W monitors, just send an e-mail to bannword2@yahoo.com and request that it be sent to you.   As always, we highly encourage you to see these films for yourself and, if applicable, make your own judgment call on the N-word usage – appropriate/inappropriate? necessary/unnecessary? sensible/nonsensical? does it add to or take away from the film’s concept? does the N-word have to be used at all? is there a valid reason for doing so? is it mandatory for the scene(s) to be effective? what are the circumstances/situation that necessitate any use of the word? is it just thrown in for humor, fear, crime, insult? are other culturally insulting slang terms used as much as the N-word in the film?   Lots of questions and a whole lot of reasons to wonder what’s the real purpose and thought process behind why these entertainers, writers, directors, producers, executive producers, distributors, and studios/studio heads and executives give the “greenlight” for these crews to liberally use (or allow to be used) the N-word.

FEATURE FILM(S) :

R E I G N   O V E R   M E

[Release Date:   3/23/07]

Starring Don Cheadle, Adam Sandler, Jada Pinkett Smith, Liv Tyler, Donald Sutherland; screenplay written by Mike Binder; directed by Mike Binder; produced by Jack Binder, Michael Rotenberg; executive produced by Jack Giarraputo, Lynwood Spinks; studio – Columbia Pictures/Sony
 

NONE

LOW TO EXCESSIVE

XXXXX

 

NOTE :   Don Cheadle is really not at his best in this film.   He plays such a passive second fiddle to Adam Sandler’s character.   What a waste to have Cheadle and Jada Pinkett Smith in the same film and not give them quality screen time together.   Along with a somewhat dull script, the one other oddity about this film is how there were constant references to last names – “Fineman” seemed to be said intentionally at least ten times; it must have been the writer’s idiosyncrasy for this film to have a running theme on repeating last names, which was noticeable and odd.

S H O O T E R

[Release Date:   3/23/07]

Starring Danny Glover, Mark Wahlberg, Michael Pena, Ned Beatty; screenplay written by Jonathan Lemkin; directed by Antoine Fuqua; produced by Lorenzo Di Bonaventura, Ric Kidney; executive produced by Erik Howsam, Mark Johnson; studio – Paramount Pictures
 

NONE

LOW TO EXCESSIVE

XXXXX

 

NOTE :   Entertaining – but very violent – film.   Its primary focus was on dirty politicians and law enforcement officials as well as rampant corruption in government and law on a global scale.   Subtle references to 9/11 and how America trains for war and murder – but not for peace!

A R E   W E   D O N E   Y E T?

[Release Date:   4/4/07]

Starring Ice Cube, Nia Long, Aleisha Allen, Philip Daniel Bolden, John C. McGinley; screenplay written by Hank Nelken; directed by Steve Carr; produced by Ted Hartley, Ice Cube, Matt Alvarez, Todd Garner; executive produced by Heidi Santelli, Aaron Ray, Steve Carr, Derek Dauchy, Neil Machlis; studio – Revolution Studios/Columbia Pictures
 

NONE

LOW TO EXCESSIVE

XXXXX

 

NOTE :   Unfortunately, this film was boring, predictable, and just silly sometimes – would anybody really buy a home for hundreds of thousands of dollars without getting it inspected?   Come on now…

P E R F E C T   S T R A N G E R

[Release Date:   4/13/07]

Starring Halle Berry, Bruce Willis, Gary Dourdan; screenplay written by Todd Komarnicki; directed by James Foley; produced by Elaine Goldsmith-Thomas; executive produced by Ron Bozman, Deborah Schindler, Charles Newirth; studio – Revolution Studios/Sony/Columbia Pictures
 

NONE

LOW TO EXCESSIVE

XXXXX

 

NOTE :   This film had an interesting premise but it just didn’t feel complete.   Also, there were a lot of body shots of Halle Berry – legs, backside – that were just too noticeable (like the last name references in the “Reign” film).   Yeah, she has some sex appeal and all, but the director was just too obvious in this area.

S L O W   B U R N

[Release Date:   4/13/07]

Starring LL Cool J, Ray Liotta, Jolene Blalock, Mekhi Phifer, Chiwetel Ejiofor, Taye Diggs; screenplay written by Wayne Beach, Anthony Walton; directed by Wayne Beach; produced by Bonnie Timmerman, Fisher Stevens, Sidney Kimmel, Tim Williams, Matthew Rowland; executive produced by Andrew S. Karsch, Andy Reimer, John Penotti, Ray Liotta; studio – Lionsgate
 

NONE

LOW TO EXCESSIVE

 

XXXXX

NOTE :   Some aspects of this film are reminiscent of “The Usual Suspects,” just not as polished.   “Wigger” and the N-word were used one time each and it was used more with an effort to make a social point rather than as a slang term.   There were some rather unusually factual quotes in it for a film made in America and they were:   “Black is a gift, a strength, not a deficit” and “Why does the White man want to suck the Black man’s blood?”  

 

BN-W Monitor Coming Soon:  “Home of the Brave” [Samuel L. Jackson, Curtis ’50 Cent’ Jackson, Victoria Rowell]; The Kingdom” [Jamie Foxx, Jennifer Garner]; “Even Money” [Forest Whitaker, Kim Basinger]; “Rush Hour 3” [Chris Tucker, Jackie Chan]; “Talk to Me” [Don Cheadle, Chiwetel Ejiofor]; “Hairspray” [Queen Latifah, John Travolta, Michelle Pfeiffer]; “1408” [Samuel L. Jackson, John Cusack]; “The Invasion” [Jeffrey Wright, Nicole Kidman, Daniel Craig]; “Resurrecting the Champ” [Samuel L. Jackson, Josh Hartnett];   “The Comebacks” [Carl Weathers]

Also Coming :   Part II:   Black-Jewish Relations; Bi-Monthly Music Monitors

Ban The N Word
   RECOMMENDED LINKS
  
button
    

button

 
button
 
HARRIET WASHINGTON
MEDICAL APARTHEID
  
button
 
  
ROOTS BY ALEX HALEY

KUNTA KINTE/THEME
  
button
    
WITHOUT SANCTUARY
LYNCHINGS IN AMERICA

 
button  
   
     
   BN-W HIGHLIGHTS
 
button
 
  
button
    
   

Angela Davis
   
   SCHOLARS
 
button
   
 
button
   
 
button
   
 
button
   
   
    
more...
     
man woman
     
   SCHOLARS - ARTICLES
 
button
   
 
button
   
 
button
   
 
button
   
 
button
   
   
     
   VIDEO LINKS
 
button
    
RICHARD PRYOR
NOT USING THE N-WORD
 
button
   
 
button
   
 
button
   
 
button
   
   
    
Egypt
   MUSIC MONITORS
 
button
    
 
button
    
 
button
    
 
button
    
 
button
    
   

 

 

Ban The N Word
         

 

© 2015 Ban the N-Word

 

Cafe Urban Hosting

s